Posts Tagged ‘travel insurance’

Race to Break 1000 Miles Per Hour on Land

http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/
Thrust SSC image: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ThrustSSC

Thrust SSC image: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ThrustSSC

In 1997, Royal Air Force pilot Andy Green (now 53) strapped himself in the Thrust SSC (Super Sonic Car). He flashed across the Nevada desert, in the U.S, to set the world land-speed record of 1,228 kilometres per hour, an achievement no one thought would ever be beaten.

Now Andy is working with aeronautic engineers to build the Bloodhound Supersonic Car; with the ambition of breaking the magic 1,000 miles an hour barrier.

Along the way he is hoping to inspire a new generation of engineers.

The first plan is to reach 800 miles an hour (1,287 kilometres per hour) next year in South Africa. Should that go as planned then the goal for 1,000 miles per hour will be set for 2017.

Bloodhound SSC image: http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Bloodhound SSC image: http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

The Bloodhound SSC is a $32 million car that looks more like a spaceship.

It employs three power drives – a Rolls-Royce EJ200, a jet engine from a Eurofighter Typhoon; a cluster of Nammo hybrid rockets synced together; and a Jagua V8 engine whose sole purpose is to drive the oxidiser pump.

“It’s an aeroplane, but on four wheels,” said Mark Blackwell, a project technician.

As stated previously, one of the main goals is to beat the 20 year-old record. But another strong motivation is to give kids around the world a taste of modern science.

Richard Noble explained to AFP how the Ministry of defence told them they have trouble recruiting engineers.

“In the U.S. during 1961 to 1972 the number of PhD’s achieved in science increased by 300 per cent.” This was primarily because of the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Since then interest in science has dwindled.

Bloodhound SSC image: http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

Bloodhound SSC image: http://www.bloodhoundssc.com/

But the Bloodhound SSC is hoping to change that.

Noble said footage of the car, and the maths and science relating to it, is being uploaded to a website available to students and teachers.

“Kids respond very well; (they) set up rocket clubs, (and) do more maths,” said Kirsty Allpress from the Bloodhound Education Team.

“What you’ve got here is an enormous global online game.”

Blachowicz Beaten Up in UFC 191

Image: https://twitter.com/JanBlachowicz/status/640641449512538112/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Corey Anderson won a lop-sided heavyweight match up against Jan Blachowicz in UFC 191 on the weekend. It seems the loss has damaged more than just Blachowicz’s face and body.

Blachowicz posted a picture of his battered face after the fight.

He wrote, “I have to take a break for the next few months. I have to think, put everything together, do some analysis, and primarily to restore my passion and spark that I lost. In a few hours I’ll come back to you guys and I’ll say more.”

And Blachowicz has good reason for the rethink.

Judges scored the bout 30-25, 30-25, 29-26 to Anderson.

Anderson overwhelmed Blachowicz with his wrestling and improved Brazilian jiu-jitsu. H didn’t have it all his own way, saying after the bout, “I got my teeth knocked in again, but came out with avictolry; that’s priceless.

Blachowicz managed to land a few shots in the first round. Anderson adjusted by switching to a grappling-focused fight. Blachowicz was unable to match him in this area and Anderson controlled the rest of the fight.

Anderson took balchowicz to the canvas in the first, but nearly got trapped with an armbar.

In the second he caught a kick from Blachowicz, took his opponent to the mat, and mounted him for top-position.

Anderson then laid on the ground-and-pound with a torrent of damaging g punches and elbows.

In the end it was his superior conditioning that allowed Anderson to keep pouring on the pressure

“I’ve got cardio and pressure forever,” he said. “I don’t get tired.

Anderson now moves to a record of 6-1; while Blachowicz drops to 18-5.

Briggs Confronts Klitschko Again!

Image: https://www.facebook.com/110523639683/photos/a.10152128700509684.1073741827.110523639683/10152650819319684/?type=1&theater

If emulation is the greatest compliment then boxing is a fan of the UFC.

This week Shannon Briggs took a leaf out of the UFC marketing playbook and continued his haranguing of heavyweight king Wladimir Klitschko – causing worldwide media interest.

Briggs, 43 years-old, is due to fight Michael Marrone this weekend. But he made sure there were cameras around when he confronted arch rival Klitschko at a Florida gym – and then posted the footage on social media.

Briggs is desperate for a fight against IBF, WBA, WBO champion Kiltschoko; and has been pursuing this dream for more than a year.

Klitschko, however, has bigger fights, with a defence of his title s against Britain’s Tyson Fury due on October 24.

This latest ‘staged’ run-in only escalates interest in an inevitable showdown.

Briggs has disrupted Klitschko’s press conferences, knocked him off a paddle board, even gatecrashed the champion at a quiet lunch.

TMZ Sport suggests the latest fracas became quite heated off camera, with boxing legend Evander Holyfield having to intervene before fists flew.

Polish Giant Wins Belt With KO of the Year

Image: https://www.facebook.com/KrzysztofGlowaGlowacki/photos/a.331309400335753.1073741825.331308617002498/331312550335438/?type=1&theater

The social media world has gone into overdrive at the vicious KO of Marco Huck at the hands of previously unknown Krzysztof Glowacki.

Glowacki, a 29 year-old Polish boxer stunned the WBO cruiserweight champion with a brutal 11th round knockout on Friday night. The win ended Huck’s six-year championship streak and cemented Glowacki as one of the most devastating punchers on the planet.

The win was Glowacki’s 26th career victory.

“My trainer (Fiodor Lapin) told me to pace myself and I didn’t listen to him,” said a clearly euphoric Glowacki. “I knew the second part of the fight wasn’t mine, so I decided to go for broke. Not even for a second did I think I would lose this fight.

“This is the biggest night of my life.”

Huck’s promoter, Lou DiBella, said it was a magnificent fight, even though it was his man that ended on the canvas.

“Huck had pulled ahead and he is a beastly strong guy,” said DiBella. “But this Glowacki did not stop coming. He was like the undertaker. He was dead on the canvas and got up and went and got Huck. That was a great fight.

“This is the entertainment business, and that was entertainment.”

Huck spent most of his boxing career in his native Germany, but moved to America to build his career.

He remained firm against a strong-starting Glowacki, enduring a first round flurry of aggressive punches.

In the sixth round Huck stunned the Pole and came within a hair’s breadth of winning the fight.

Glowacki managed to stay in the contest. The two traded blows until the 11th round when Glowacki landed several bell-ringers on Huck’s chin, leading to the KO.

Huck was ahead on all three scorecards until he hit the canvas.

Greyhound Racing Officials Shot At!

Greyhound image: en.wikipedia.org

Greyhound Racing Victoria confirmed yesterday that a firearm was allegedly discharged in the vicinity of two GRV Animal Welfare Officers and two other GRV staff.

The altercation came as the four attempted to undertake a routine inspection of a property in eastern Victoria. After the firearm was discharged the four allege they were then subjected to an attempted assault.

Greyhound Racing Victoria said iy was “aware of and deeply disturbed by the incident.”

The Domestic Animal Act’s Code of Practice for the Operation of Greyhound Establishments allows for inspectors and their assistants to ensure registered owners are complying with the terms of the Act.

“If these allegations are proven to be correct,” said Bernie Carolan, Chairman of the GRV, then it is another example of the kind of behaviour that is not welcome in the Victorian greyhound racing industry or anywhere for that matter.

Mr Carolan was referring to the behaviour of certain members who, in February, were found to have been using live baits to train their racing dogs.

The subsequent investigation found some licensed trainers were using animals such as possums, pigs and rabbits as lures in their training of greyhounds.

The subsequent outrage forced the various state governing bodies to implement a 10 year ban for those convicted of the practice.

Referring to the incident yesterday Mr Carolan said: “To think that someone could do this to staff there to help them is unfathomable.”

Matador Gored in Groin

Image: en.wikipedia.org

The matador doesn’t always win.

Well-known Spanish bullfighter Franscisco ‘Paquirri’ Rivera Ordonez was taken to hospital on Wednesday after coming off second against a bull.

Paquirri was said to be in a serious, but stable, condition after being gored in the groin during a bullfight in Huesca, north-eastern Aragon.

The bulls horn was said to have sunk 25 centimetres into Pacquirri’s groin, but had missed his vital organs.

Footage of the fight went viral as the bull impaled Pacquirri on one of its horns and hoisted him into the air for a few seconds.

Pacquirri’s father, of the same name, also a bullfighter, was gored to death in Andalusia in 1984. While Paquirri’s grandfather, Antonio Ordonez, was reputed to be one of the greatest bullfighters in history.

But deaths from bulls don’t just come in the ring.

On Sunday a man who was using his mobile phone to film a bull run through the streets of Villaseca de la Sagra, in central Spain, was gored in the neck. He died very quickly in front of horrified onlookers.

The Real Damage of KO’s

Image: en.wikipedia.org

“Never leave it in the hands of the judges.” This is the unofficial motto of the UFC.

To that end fighters are encouraged to submit or knock out their opponents every chance they get. But while submissions give a fighter a chance to surrender KO’s don’t.

And the consequences can be far-reaching.

An American Association of Neurological Surgeons report, in 2014, founds that the force generated by a professional boxer’s punch is equal to that of a 9 kg bowling ball travelling at 32km/hr.

When it impacts with a defenders head the sudden movement shocks the brain – the rapid acceleration and deceleration of the skull squashes the brain within its cavity, causing trauma to the soft tissue.

Depending upon the severity of the impact the brain may bounce around, striking the inside of the skull several times before coming to rest.

The brain tissues then goes into overdrive sending out a series of neurotransmissions demanding blood to repair the damage.

According to Anthony Alessi, a neurologist and boxing physician, when the blood supply to the brain is unequal to the amount necessary to repair the damage the fighter will lose consciousness. It’s the body’s way of protecting itself: shut down and heal.

But knockouts aren’t always one-punch fight-finishers.

In an article published in Popular Mechanics Alessi spoke about the cumulative effects leading to KO’s. This is when blood supply is meeting regenerative demands, but only just.

The first indication a fighter may be nearing unconsciousness is their feet.

“They become flat-footed, which is the inability to adjust. Boxers can’t move forwards or backwards quickly.

“As you watch their feet, you realise that the same lack of coordination is going on in their upper extremities, in their hands. And eventually they are unable to defend themselves,” said Alessi.

Image: en.wikipedia.org

Image: en.wikipedia.org

Studies have found that around 90 per cent of professional boxers will suffer some form of head trauma throughout their career. Other research has suggested that between 15 – 40 per cent of boxers will, at some point, show signs of chronic brain injury.

Between 1960 and 2011 there have been approximately 488 deaths from boxing related injuries. 66 per cent of these are related to head and neck trauma.

In 2014 three professional boxers died from knockout punches.

Earlier this year Braydon Smith, a professional boxer in Australia, collapsed following his welterweight bout in Toowoomba, Queensland. He showed severe swelling on the brain from injuries sustained through the fight.

Concealed Motor Accusations Plague TDF Leader Chris Froome

Motor image: http://cyclingtips.com.au/2015/04/hidden-motors-for-road-bikes-exist-heres-how-they-work/

It seems almost ludicrous, but the accusations of a concealed motor in the bike of Chris Froome (current Tour de France leader) won’t go away.

Froome is also battling allegations of using performance enhancing drugs.

Many believe the incredible accelerations created by Froome are only possible with the aid of a concealed motor.

And believe it or not, such things are real.

Chris Froome image: en.wikipedia.org

Chris Froome image: en.wikipedia.org

“It seems like the bike is pedalling itself,” said Cedric Vasseur, a former competitive cyclist now working for French television.

Concealed motors weigh less than 750g, can generate up to 200 watts of power, and hold a charge for anywhere between 60 and 90 minutes.

As outlined in this Cyclingtips article, the motor would only need to be used to supplement the rider’s power in crucial stages of a race. These crucial stages are usually the areas most lined with noisy fans. Any noise from the motor, then (and they’re pretty quiet) would be easily drowned out by the roadside spectators.

Similar allegations were made of Fabian Cancellara, the 2010 Tour of Flanders and Paris – Roubaix victor.

Union Cyclists Internationale: en.wikipedia.org

Union Cyclists Internationale: en.wikipedia.org

Brian Cookson, president of the international Cycling Union (UCI) said the organisation is taking the issue very seriously.

“We’ve done some testing already for concealed motors.

“We understand that although this subject sometimes causes amusement and derision we know that the technology is available: We have seen examples of it in laboratory conditions.

“We have no evidence that it has been used in competition, yet sadly we do know that in competitive sport sometimes some people will try to find ways of cheating.”

TT Isle of Man – Most Dangerous Event on the Planet

Image: en.wikipedia.org

Each year the TT Isle of Man attracts tens of thousands of spectators and some of the most daring men on the planet for a high-octane battle for all.

And I mean ALL!

At stake is the kudos of racing, and perhaps, winning the most notorious sporting event on the planet.

And the race is notorious for a reason:

The Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) takes place at over 300 k/hr over winding roads and around country farmhouses. The slippery roads are dotted with stone walls, telephone poles, and ice cream vans.

In fact (to drive the point home) the starting line is opposite a graveyard where the ashes of former competitors are sprinkled.

It doesn’t seem to deter the racers who are thrilled to test their skills against the course and each other.

The event is more than 100 years-old. In that time 246 riders have died, with many more being injured. So long as you qualify you may race – this isn’t for professionals only.

There is only the most modest attempts to protect riders – hay bales line the most dangerous parts of the course, a few mattresses are wrapped around some telephone poles.

Image: commons.wikimedia.org

Image: commons.wikimedia.org

In 1970 six riders were killed during what is known the Mad Sunday race.

And the crowds, standing just metres away from the action, aren’t immune either.

When it comes to deaths, this is an audience-participation sport.

In 2013 Jonathon Howarth lost control on the first lap and ploughed into the crowd, injuring 11. Ten days later Japanese competitor Yoshinari Matsushita was killed in a qualifying session. Australian spectators Marc Ramsbotham, Dean Jacob, and Gregory Knezig died in 2007.

The crowds will tell you it is the risk that draws them to the TT Isle of Man. In this uber-safe world, where there are rules for everything, this is arguably the only uninhibited competitive event in the world.

The Hidden Side of Professional Boxing

Laight losing image: www.independent.co.uk

In boxing parlance they’re known as Journeymen. They are fighters skilled enough to protect themselves, brave enough to fight anyone, and tough enough to take a beating – but they also must pose little to no threat to anyone.

There’s a little known side to boxing – One in which fight promoters need their ‘prospects’ given experience without the risk of being beaten up.

Enter the Journeyman.

Kristian Laight is one of the most well-known journeymen in professional boxing. Since beginning his career at the Britannia International Hotel in London in November of 2003, he has fought an amazing 215 times.

Among boxers Laight’s record is deplorable, but among professional Journeymen Laight is a legend. The 34 year-old boasts a record of 9-199-7! That’s 199 losses!

Laight is even so well known as a Journeyman he was given his own chapter in a recently released book Journeymen: The Other Side of the Boxing Business.

Laight said he never planned for his career to go the way it has. Like any new boxer he dreamed of being another champion.

“I thought I could actually do something, you know, be some sort of champion,” he said on BBC. “It dawned on me, probably after the fifth fight, I wasn’t going to be a champion, that’s for sure.”

Journeymen occupy a very necessary niche in professional boxing. And their defensive skills make them, in their own way, champions.

Laight v Stalker image www.dailymail.co.uk

Laight v Stalker image www.dailymail.co.uk

“I just go in and look after myself, do my job to get through the fight, and reach that final bell in one piece, get my money, come home, and have to fight again the week after It’s a month’s wages for most people, for 12 minutes work.”

But Laight is risking serious injury every time he steps into the ring.

His opponents are usually totally unknown to him. He has to be able protect himself against anyone, entertain the crowd, give his opponent some kind of test, all while not ending the ‘prospect’s’ career with a crushing defeat.

Oh, and Laight has to be ready to fight at a moment’s notice

“One time I’d literally just gone to the pub, my phone’s gone and before I’ve had a sip of my pint my manager’s said ‘You’ve got a fight later on; get out of the pub’ You’ve always go to be ready because the phone could go at any time.”