Ronda Rousey Takes Aim at Octagon Ring Girls

Image: "Arianny Celeste (crop)" by US Marine Corps - AriannyLopez.png. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arianny_Celeste_(crop).jpg#mediaviewer/File:Arianny_Celeste_(crop).jpg

Bantamweight world champion Ronda Rousey has taken the UFC to task for allegedly paying the ring girls more than some fighters.

Rousey, a two-time judo Olympian, said, “They (fighters) should get paid more than the ring girls.”

No one except the individuals involved knows how much any of them get paid. Neither the salaries of the fighters, nor those of ring girls have been disclosed by the UFC.

In both cases, however, the money they earn on the job is usually just the tip of the iceberg. Depending upon their contracts both the ring girls and the fighters can earn other monies as a consequence of their high profiles. Octagon cardholders Arianny Celeste and Brittney Palmer, for instance, are always being feted for glamour magazine photo-shoots. While several past and current UFC fighters (including Rousey herself) have accrued massive supplemental income from sources as diverse as movie acting.

One other variable Rousey seemed to forget was that the ring girls work a lot more frequently than the fighters. Where fighters may show up for fights twice or three times a year the ring girls do so that many times a week.

Granted, a ring girl doesn’t risk serious, long term physical damage as part of her job. But then neither does she receive the same kind of medical coverage.

“I don’t know if the ring girls get paid too much or the fighters don’t get paid enough,” Rousey said ahead of the build up to her UFC 184 conference. “But yeah, there’s definitely a lot more in what the fighters do than what they do. So I think that’s one thing that’s unfair.”

Rousey obviously doesn’t understand the demands made on the ring girls. Where a fighter has to diet to a certain weight prior to a fight, a ring girl has to maintain that weight all the time. As such, what she can and cannot do (dining, public appearances, sports that may injure their flawless skin etc.) extend well beyond wiggling around the Octagon two nights a week.

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