Archive for the ‘sports science’ Category

Polish Giant Wins Belt With KO of the Year


The social media world has gone into overdrive at the vicious KO of Marco Huck at the hands of previously unknown Krzysztof Glowacki.

Glowacki, a 29 year-old Polish boxer stunned the WBO cruiserweight champion with a brutal 11th round knockout on Friday night. The win ended Huck’s six-year championship streak and cemented Glowacki as one of the most devastating punchers on the planet.

The win was Glowacki’s 26th career victory.

“My trainer (Fiodor Lapin) told me to pace myself and I didn’t listen to him,” said a clearly euphoric Glowacki. “I knew the second part of the fight wasn’t mine, so I decided to go for broke. Not even for a second did I think I would lose this fight.

“This is the biggest night of my life.”

Huck’s promoter, Lou DiBella, said it was a magnificent fight, even though it was his man that ended on the canvas.

“Huck had pulled ahead and he is a beastly strong guy,” said DiBella. “But this Glowacki did not stop coming. He was like the undertaker. He was dead on the canvas and got up and went and got Huck. That was a great fight.

“This is the entertainment business, and that was entertainment.”

Huck spent most of his boxing career in his native Germany, but moved to America to build his career.

He remained firm against a strong-starting Glowacki, enduring a first round flurry of aggressive punches.

In the sixth round Huck stunned the Pole and came within a hair’s breadth of winning the fight.

Glowacki managed to stay in the contest. The two traded blows until the 11th round when Glowacki landed several bell-ringers on Huck’s chin, leading to the KO.

Huck was ahead on all three scorecards until he hit the canvas.

NFL Player’s Second Job

JJ Watts image:

NFL superstar JJ Watt is a big man.

In an interview with ESPN he spoke about what it takes to get and stay that big.

The man from Houstan, Texas says he eats between 6,000 and 9,000 calories each day, depending on his level of activity.

To consume this massive amount Watt targets food high in protein and quality fats (not all fats are bad). But he admits he does have ‘cheat days’ where he just eats what he wants.

As an example: Watts would eat eight chicken breasts in a single sitting. But his trainer suggested wrapping three of them in bacon and adding sweet potatoes, pasta and olive oil (fats) to boost his calorie intake.

While Watts was reluctant to reveal his specific diet he did admit it would take about 20 chicken breasts, 13 avocados, and 50 slices of bacon to reach the target of 9,000 a day.

This makes eating his part-time job!

Watts added, “I love brunch. Brunch is my favourite meal. I had brunch, had a massive potato pancake omelette, which is an omelette inside a potato pancake. Then I had stuffed French toast with berries and stuff. My cheat meals aren’t even that exciting. That was my cheat meal. The omelette is still pretty darn healthy. The stuffed French toast was the cheat meal, but that was delicious.”

But it’s not all fun. Watts admitted, “It’s exhausting. You have to force feed. You have to force yourself to eat food.”

Oh, and Watts has to train like a demon too – let’s not forget that.

Amanda Nunes Emerges as Possible Contender for Ronda Rousey

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It might be consider rude to have already looked past Miesha Tate. But the MMA world is cautiously suggesting Amanda Nunes may be the only woman capable of testing Ronda Rowsey.

On Sunday evening, in Nashville, 27 year-old Nunes destroyed number 4 ranked women’s bantamweight Sara McMann in less than three minutes.

Nunes rocked McMann with a clubbing right hand early in the first. With McMann backing up Nunes was able to pour on the pressure and position herself to take the American’s back.

.Nunes didn’t want to grapple with the Olympic level wrestler; so she unleashed some powerful ground-and-pound to overwhelm and soften up her opponent.

As McMann began weaken Nunes lunged and secured a rear-naked choke, forcing McMann to tap.

The win makes Nunes a genuine title contender for undefeated champion Ronda Rousey.

Rousey has dominated her division so overwhelmingly many are considering her fight against Miesha Tate a mere card-filler and looking to Nunes to provide some real competition.

“My background is jiu-jitsu and judo,” said the Brazilian. “I love striking, but I come from grappling. I’m ready, I’m the lion. Let’s do it … The champion has a fight coming up, maybe I’m next?”

Rousey’s Olympic level judo has proved a problem for many women bantamweight hopefuls. Nunes can nullify that skill with her own.

Nunes is currently 4-1 in the UFC with her only loss coming at the hands of Cat Zingano, in 2014. A fight she almost won in the first round before losing by TKO in the dying minutes of the three round fight.

The Real Damage of KO’s


“Never leave it in the hands of the judges.” This is the unofficial motto of the UFC.

To that end fighters are encouraged to submit or knock out their opponents every chance they get. But while submissions give a fighter a chance to surrender KO’s don’t.

And the consequences can be far-reaching.

An American Association of Neurological Surgeons report, in 2014, founds that the force generated by a professional boxer’s punch is equal to that of a 9 kg bowling ball travelling at 32km/hr.

When it impacts with a defenders head the sudden movement shocks the brain – the rapid acceleration and deceleration of the skull squashes the brain within its cavity, causing trauma to the soft tissue.

Depending upon the severity of the impact the brain may bounce around, striking the inside of the skull several times before coming to rest.

The brain tissues then goes into overdrive sending out a series of neurotransmissions demanding blood to repair the damage.

According to Anthony Alessi, a neurologist and boxing physician, when the blood supply to the brain is unequal to the amount necessary to repair the damage the fighter will lose consciousness. It’s the body’s way of protecting itself: shut down and heal.

But knockouts aren’t always one-punch fight-finishers.

In an article published in Popular Mechanics Alessi spoke about the cumulative effects leading to KO’s. This is when blood supply is meeting regenerative demands, but only just.

The first indication a fighter may be nearing unconsciousness is their feet.

“They become flat-footed, which is the inability to adjust. Boxers can’t move forwards or backwards quickly.

“As you watch their feet, you realise that the same lack of coordination is going on in their upper extremities, in their hands. And eventually they are unable to defend themselves,” said Alessi.



Studies have found that around 90 per cent of professional boxers will suffer some form of head trauma throughout their career. Other research has suggested that between 15 – 40 per cent of boxers will, at some point, show signs of chronic brain injury.

Between 1960 and 2011 there have been approximately 488 deaths from boxing related injuries. 66 per cent of these are related to head and neck trauma.

In 2014 three professional boxers died from knockout punches.

Earlier this year Braydon Smith, a professional boxer in Australia, collapsed following his welterweight bout in Toowoomba, Queensland. He showed severe swelling on the brain from injuries sustained through the fight.

Rousey Retains Title with Demolition of Correia


Ronda Rousey (12-0-0) said she’d take her time with Bethe Correia (9-1); and I suppose by her standards she did.

MMA superstar and undefeated women’s bantamweight champion Rousey demolished Correia in 34 seconds – a full 20 seconds longer than her previous fight.

But it was the manner of her win that stunned the world.

Rousey is known – and rightly feared – for her expertise as a submissions specialist and judo expert. 9 of her wins have come through submissions, most of them through an almost patented armbar.

But Rousey said she wanted to send a message with this fight.

Correia sent an ill-informed tweet obliquely referring to the sad demise of Rousey’s father. It was a mistake.

Even though she apologised for the slip Correia kept trash-talking, attempting to belittle and intimidate her opponent – another mistake.

When the door to the Octagon closed Correia was made to pay for those mistakes.

Both women charged towards each other when the bell rang. They exchanged a flurry of punches, but it was Rousey who was the more accurate.

Though she is a striker Correia was overwhelmed by the ferocity and movement of Rousey.

As she backed up Rousey moved in to throw her. Correia sensed the attack and quickly backed away.

Rousey fired off several damaging blows as she continued to surge forward.

Correia was crowded against the cage wall and began to cover up.

From that moment Rousey just needed to find the money shot.

It didn’t take her long.

A blow to the left temple ended Correia’s night. She was unconscious before she hit the canvas.

The world was stunned.

Rousey has made a habit of destroying opponents, so fight fans should be used to seeing such total dominance from her. But for some reason the girl never fails to impress.

Rousey v Correia Today!


Ronda Rousey puts her bantamweight title on the line today against Bethe Correia. Bookmakers have Rousey at almost unbackable odds to win. And Rousey is focused.

In the lead up to the fight Correia twittered to Rousey saying she hoped the incumbent champion wouldn’t ‘kill herself’ when she loses to the Brazilian.

Rosuey was outraged – having lost her father by suicide when she was eight years old.

In response Correia apologised. But it seems to have made no difference to Rousey.

Rousey has vowed to ‘take her time’ with Correia.

“It’s definitely not going to be an Instagram fight,” said Rousey to TMZ.

“If I beat you quickly, that’s me at my nicest and most merciful. That means you get to go home unscathed with a paycheck. If I make the fight last longer, that means I don’t like you and I want you to go home looking different than the way you walked in. And I don’t like this chick.”

And Rousey can end fights quickly.

In her 11 UFC wins Rousey has only ever gone past the first round once. Herr last fight took 14 seconds before she forced Cat Zingano to tap.

But Rousey may need to be careful. Correia is a striker who thrives over longer battles of attrition.

Rousey’s rcord of 11-0 comes from 9 submissions and 2 Kos. She was named ESPY’s Fighter of the Year, edging out Floyd Mayweather Jr. She has been featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated Maxim, and ESPN The Magazine, appeared in three movies (is soon to be shooting a fourth), and released a best-selling book.

Moreover, she is credited with singlehandedly popularising women’s MMA – and most notably the UFC.

But it all goes on the line today at UFC 190.

Horn Flies Into Invercargill for Fight With Plotnykov

Jeff Horn image:

Jeff Horn, a Brisbane boxer described by boxing great Jeff Fenech as ‘the hottest talent in the country’, has flown to Invercargill, New Zealand for the fight of his life.

When he steps into the 4000 seat Stadium Southland the man he will face is the hammer-fisted world number 10 Viktor Plotnykov. Plotnykov, 37, is a veteran with 32 wins from 34 fights. He has never been stopped in a career spanning 13 years.

But if Horn is to prove himself a contender for Floyd Mayweather’s welterweight (67kg) title belt he has to get past Plotnykov.

“The key to winning,” said Horn, “is not to let Plotnykov dominate from long range.” Plotnykov is a tall lanky fighter able to deliver damaging blows at a distance.

“He’s very tall,” Horn continued, “and rangy. Plotnykov has a great jab and right hand and he likes to sit back and control the distance.

“My job is not to let that happen, but take charge straight away. I feel I have the power and workrate to trouble him immediately.”

Both Horn and Plotnykov made weight at an identical 66.15 kg.

Horn has been preparing for the bout by sparring with taller and heavier opponents. He claims to have completed 60 rounds with larger opponents during the past two weeks.

The fight will be streamed live and free on on the web.

Jeff Horn Cautiously Optimistic Ahead of Big Fight

Image for Plotnykov:

Australian Jeff Horn says he is fit and ready for the biggest fight of his life.

He is set to step into an Invercargill, New Zealand, boxing ring next week to face the terrifying Viktor Plotnykov, a wiry Ukranian giant-killer.

Horn has been battling his way through a line of taller, heavier sparring partners in preparation for the fight. His coach has had him practicing the skills they believe Horn will need if he is to emerge triumphant against the truly intimidating Plotynykov. These include: subtle feints, a right hand lead, weaving, and something only few boxers can do: switching from orthodox to southpaw stance midway through delivering a flurry of high speed punches.

These are all tools to put Plotnykov off balance.

Horn earned the right to face Plotnykov after defeating Ghana’s Richmond Djarbeng in New Zealand on 13th June. And the welterweiht Horn (67kg) believes he will have totaled close to 60 rounds against some of Australia’s hottest boxing prospects in preparation for the bout.

Horn has spent ring time with boxing royalty such as Sam Banney, Adam Copland, Nathan Weber, and Miles Zalewski. On Tuesday he went ten brutal rounds with Reagan Dessaix (79kg light-heavyweight) to prepare him for the much larger Ploynykov.

“All my sparring partners have given me great work,” said a barely out of breath Horn. “it’s a team effort when I fight, and I’ve got a great team behind me. I feel very fit and strong and I know Plotnykov will be in great shape and ready to give his best as well. I’m not underestimating him, he’s a terrific fighter, but I’ve always said I’m ready to fight anyone in the world.

“Plotnykov is going to be a tough challenge, we’re in no doubt about that,” said coach Glenn Rushton. “He just beat (former Commonwealth Champion) Denton Vassell in Belfast and has been ranked as high as number 7 in the world.

“I’ve had Jeff sparring bigger guys all throughout this preparation to make sure he is razor sharp for an opponent who is used to landing punches on the back-move. Jeff has done an enormous amount of work on his leg strength, using a weighted vest in training, to give him the explosive power he will need to cut off the ring against Plotynkov.

“He has been going though 10-round sparring sessions every second day so that doing 10 rounds on fight night is second nature to him.

This fight will be all about Jeff controlling the distance and shutting down Plotnykjov’s strengths: his jab, his right hand, and his movement.”

Horn is conceding 5cm in height to the Ukranian. Horn is undefeated in 11 pro fights, but Plotnykov has won 32 of his 34 professional fights and has never been stopped. His last loss came in 2012.

Severe Health Cost of Speed Eating Competitions

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The American medical fraternity is taking aim at the nation’s growing hunger for speed eating contests.

Health experts point to a study: ‘Competitive Speed Eating: Truth and Consequences’ published in the American Journal of Roentgenology in 2007, to warn competitors not only of the events, but also the training required for them.

Chicago-based psychiatrist and eating-disorder expert Kim Dennis likens speed eating (whether competitive or for training) as a variant of self-harm.

“Putting all of the health risks aside,” said Dennis, “there are certainly some psychological or psychiatric risks with regards to the development of an eating disorder for people who had any sort of genetic predisposition to have one.

“Somebody eating 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes is self-abusing to some extent.”

The health risks alone should be enough to warn anybody away from such a frivolous pursuit: the very real possibility of developing morbid obesity, profound gastroparesis, gastric ruptures, and dangerously low sodium levels; risks of seizures, fainting, vomiting … the list goes on.

The United States is the home of speed eating. Not only do they have their own bona fide organisation (Major League Eating), but they have some real money to be won from the more prestigious competitions.

Professional speed eaters (yes, there are people who make their living doing this) Matt Stonie won US$10,000 for first place in the Nathan’s Famous hot dog eating contest on July 4 this year.
Stonie revealed he binge ate up to 60 hot dogs three times a week to prepare for the event.
He also admitted he (and other competitors) didn’t really know what they were doing when it came to training.

“A lot of us don’t know what we’re doing,” Stonie admitted.

“We’re just experimenting. Sometimes people go a little gung-ho, a little overboard, and hurt themselves.”

Even the organisation behind the speed eating events is concerned at the health risks associated with the sport and tr4aining. “It’s ridiculous,” said George Shea, co-founder of Major League Eating and organiser of the Nathan’s Famous contest. “You don’t need to do it (training) … there’s no arms race to 100 (hot dogs).

But like in any competition people are always after an edge over their rivals. If that edge comes from training (and frequent binge eating) then that’s what they’ll do.

Bisping Claims Gutsy Win – at a Cost


British middleweight favourite Michael Bisping has ground out a split-decision over Thales Leites. In a brutal five rounds on Saturday night. Bisping managed to outpoint his more fancied rival despite sustaining a hampering toe injury in the first round.

Leites strode into the centre of the cage, controlling the distance and the Octagon for much of the match.

Bisping responded by circling and firing off lighting jabs whenever the opportunity presented itself.

Both men sunk in deep, painful leg kicks throughout the match. Both men charged at the other druing the entire fight, trying to exert their dominance.

And while both men used their aggression to unleash a volley of stinging punches it was Bisping who managed to land the greater number.

But it was Englishman’s toe injury that dominated much of the post-fight talk.

Photo’s show a large chunk of flesh hanging off the inside of Bisping’s left big toe. It obviously hampered his movement and provided ringside commentators with some grisly fodder.

But Bisping was able to adapt to the set back.

He now moves to a 17-7 UFC record. And he lost no time in calling out others in his division, notably Yoel Romero and Jacare Souza – both heavy-hitters whom the ferocious Michael Bisping would like to test out.